National Review Online- Risk Mismanagement Psychoanlyzed

Share

From the lens of a psychotherapist, National Review Online provided its readers with what I consider an article of value. The article is entitled: Risk Mismanagement. I enjoy the smooth and clear weave of and articulation of the very point that I am deeply concerned about. Which is; I am concerned about the philosophical values and beliefs that have become far too prominent and continues to be growing here in America. The attitude I am referring to is one of not taking healthy risks, the attitude of determined and decided upon reliance when one is capable. Rather I would like to see an attitude of self-belief, self-worth and that has everything to do with self-reliance which encompasses the drive to strive to achieve all one can in all areas of one’s life. It is the lack of passion for really living life that concerns me. As a mental health and wellness expert for 20 years I see those who are emotionally healthy among us as those who experience fulfillment; that is professional fulfillment, relational fulfillment, and personal fulfillment. Fulfillment occurs when we take action in our lives AKA healthy risks. Those who feel well mentally and emotionally are those who believe in themselves and choose to take action in their life.

Our philosophical belief system guides us in all contexts of our life. Who we believe we are, where we envision ourselves going, and thus where we do go – whether it is choices we make regarding parenting, marriage, work . . .  It is these very philosophies that are changing before my eyes in each area of the lives of the many. Without the passion to take healthy risks, without the drive to strive for independence and self-reliance, without the belief in self and what one is capable of accomplishing – I see before me a depressed anxious climate of reliance and thus fear based decisions from the lens of feeling not in control of one’s self nor one’s destiny. A cultural climate as such leads to the opposite of mental health and wellness, and that, I am greatly concerned about.

I enjoyed the style of which the article in NRO pulled in the many aspects of what makes up a culture and people within our culture as it relates to the theme of independence and self-achievement. These are the very concepts one would suggest we teach our young children so they in turn are healthy and happy accomplished driven children. As it is those very children who thereby become adults who are functioning, contributing, happy, healthy, fulfilled and successful in their work-selves, personal-selves, and relational-selves. Thus, are people who achieve in all areas of their life as healthy individuals emotionally and mentally and thus physically – as the mind and the body is indeed interconnected.

Without the passion to try to try, we dry up. Our plant of selves we must water if we wish to grow. Choose to water thy plant of self I say in each aspect of your life, do take healthy risks! Then, self reflect and see how empowered you feel, ah.

Written by


Follow Dr. Karen on Twitter or Facebook. Media Psychotherapist Guest Expert; Relationships, Parenting, Human Behavior, Analyzes Hot Topics In The News. Has appeared on FOX News Channel's: The O'Reilly Factor, FOX & Friends, FOX & Friends FIRST, America Live, Hannity, America's Newsroom, and FOX Business Network's: Cavuto. Go–to for FOX News Boston including the regular segment; Ask Dr. Karen. Also appeared on ABC's Good Morning America, Lifetime, Discovery Network's Destination America, The Steve Harvey TV Show, and more. Sought after Radio Guest Expert. Columnist. Often quoted in various print media: FOX Business, FOX News Magazine, Boston Globe, Boston Herald, Care.com, Good Housekeeping, Yahoo Shine, Parents, Parenting, CNN, TIME, Woman's Day, Men's Health, USA Today, and more. Owner/Founder/President: Dr. Karen Ruskin & Associates, Inc. Based in Massachusetts. Author of: 9 Key Techniques For Raising Respectful Children and Dr. Karen's Marriage Manual. Copyright 2012.

Share

Powered by WPeMatico

Leave a Reply